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    Cut Work Time to: end militarism, reduce inequality, slow growth, and more

    Valuing Time more than Money is a way to fight global warming. When Time is valued more than Money, consumption will be reduced. Reduced consumption means reduced GHG emissions. Workers can learn to value time more than money — if given a way to learn that. The article below by John de...
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    San Franciwco Fed wants more women in the labor force

    Here's the link to the FED article on drawing more women into the labor force: https://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/publications/economic-letter/2018/november/why-are-us-workers-not-participating/?utm_source=mailchimp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=economic-letter The WSJ story about it is...
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    San Franciwco Fed wants more women in the labor force

    Better Family Policies Could Draw Millions of Workers Into Labor Force, Research Shows A San Francisco Fed paper compares Canada’s experience with the U.S. As more women/more anyone enter the labor force wages are driven down. Yes, the goverment can improve possibilities for women to cope with...
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    Cut Work Time to: end militarism, reduce inequality, slow growth, and more

    ohn McDonnell shapes Labour case for four-day week Economist Lord Skidelsky working with shadow chancellor on ‘practical possibilities of reducing the working week’ Dan Sabbagh Thu 8 Nov 2018 23.32 ESTLast modified on Thu 8 Nov 2018 23.39 EST Shares 7620 Labour’s John McDonnell has suggested...
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    Cut Work Time to: end militarism, reduce inequality, slow growth, and more

    Sandwhichman posted this to another list. I repost it here. The creator is the New Economics Foundation in the UK. 5 REASONS WHY NEF SUPPORTS THE 4 DAY WEEK CAMPAIGN REDUCING THE HOURS WE WORK CAN HELP FUTURE-PROOF THE ECONOMY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 05 NOVEMBER, 2018 | ARTICLES AIDAN HARPER...
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    Cut Work Time to: end militarism, reduce inequality, slow growth, and more

    Ted, thanks for engaging. I’ll respond to your 1. and 2. separately, First, thank you for taking a long view on this. Many of SCNCC discussions read, to me at least, as if folks think everything will go on as before, just with clean energy. I believe the world is going to be enormously...
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    Wages for housework

    The New York Review of Books -- which has had a strong bias toward growth and more growth -- has a "Daily" about forgotten feminists. Toward the end of the essay the featured writer praises Silvia Federici and the feminist movement called "Wages for Housework." Wages for Housework movement...
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    Cut Work Time to: end militarism, reduce inequality, slow growth, and more

    INTRODUCTION Without a strategy which SCNCC adopts, advocates, and wins, SYSTEM CHANGE will be a slogan and not much more. Cutting work time with no cut in pay is a key strategy in the US economy. It adds jobs to the economy without requiring endless growth, and it will redistribute income...
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    What's a Strategic Focus for Ecosocialists: Plastics, Housing, or Transportation?

    These are good questions. Good questions, not just about plastics but, suitably altered, about any campaign to spend effort on supporting. I would add one more for all campaigns. How will this campaign affirmatively affect the culture?
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    Ecosocialism’s Greatest Challenge: The Color-Line and the Twenty-First Century Ecoleft

    Ted, this is a very articulate and comprehensive review of the week of the GCAS. What hasn't been mentioned by other commenters is the wisdom embedded in your article. The question I ask is this. Beyond humility -- which I endorse --what is it that ecosocialists can / must advocate that will...
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    Scientific and Revolutionary Reticence in the Age of the Anthropocene

    Brad, thanks for the quote from Marx. If we all agree (you, Marx and I) that production and consumption are inseparable, then the question becomes this: If we want to reduce them both, what is the most effective way to do so? My contention, obviously, is to focus on reducing consumption...
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    Scientific and Revolutionary Reticence in the Age of the Anthropocene

    Brad, you say "In my analysis of capitalism the centrality of production is prioritized, with consumption being derivative, for good reason, ... ." But production is the same thing as consumption. if what is produced is not being sold, consumed, production shuts down. So, if production and...
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    Scientific and Revolutionary Reticence in the Age of the Anthropocene

    Brad, There is another dimension to this that I think is seriously, fatally, neglected. In the call for shutting down industries -- airlines, automobiles, etc -- missing is the upheaval in the lives of individuals. Yes, of course the capitalists see that and count on those individuals to...
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    Sylvoa Federici and Wages for Housework

    A clear but simple intoduction to the Wages for Housework movement can be found in the article in the magazine "n + 1", by Dayna Tortorici, where it appeared in the Fall 2013 issue. DAYNA TORTORICI More Smiles? More Money Published in Issue 17: The Evil Issue Publication date Fall 2013...
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    Climate Crisis and Managed Deindustrialization: Debating Alternatives to Ecological Collapse

    This is a response to both Richard Smith and Saral Sarkar. Neither of these essays, by Richard Smith and Saral Sarkar are useful in providing a strategy for SCNCC. There have been good responses on population control from others already, (Ted F, David Klein, Ian Angus and others) I will...
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    Ecocentric Eco-Socialism as the Solution to the World Social and Planetary Crisis

    On October 27, 2017, and for a few days after, there was an exchange about strategy and tactics. The post in that series that I most agreed with was by Larry Tallman, along with Michael Gasser's remarks. Both of those - (and please read them directly as I will paste them below) -- both of...
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    Moving Away from Unpaid Labor:Toward A Feminist Eco-Socialist Future

    Sandra, I am a follower of the women of the "Wages for Housework" movement, coming mainly out of Italy in the 1970s. Of course they are still active and writing and organizing. Sylvia Federici is one of them and featured in the article I will try to link below. Wages for Housework is commonly...
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